Honorary Fellows Of The Metabolomics Society

An Honorary Fellowship is a significant lifetime award granted by the Society to exceptional members of our community. Commissioned in 2012, and with up to two awards each year, the Board of Directors is pleased to recognise the following outstanding scientists.

  • Call for Nominations now open for Honorary Fellows through February 29, 2024.
  • Nominees will be required to meet one of the following criteria: (1) recognised as making outstanding contributions to the Metabolomics Society over a sustained period of time; (2) recognised as making a pioneering and sustained contribution to the science of metabolomics at an international level, within the fields of technology development, computational biology or application to a specific discipline.
  • Nominations received after the deadline will not be considered for appointment for that year, but may be held over for the following year.
  • Any full Member of the Society may nominate a person for consideration as an Honorary Fellow; the nominee does not need to be a member. The nomination should be submitted to the Chair of the Society’s Nominations & Election Committee (nominations@metabolomicssociety.org).
  • The nomination must include the following documentation:
    • details of why this nominee should be considered (500 words or less);
    • explicit mention of the specific contribution (50 words or less, suitable for the election notice on website and plaque);
    • support from at least 2 additional Members in good standing (not student members) and from different institutions (name, email, affiliation);
    • a detailed CV for the nominee.
  • The Board will confirm the nominee’s willingness to accept the recognition, which will be announced at the Metabolomics Society’s annual conference.

Honorary Fellows

Pieter has played a major role in developing new MS and informatics for the scientific community to link health and disease phenotypes to the underlying biochemistry and genetics, with an emphasis on molecules from microbes and the chemical environments of microbiomes. Pieter’s foundation of GNPS is truly inspiring and he has developed tools that translate the chemical language between cells.

Jules’ work has immense impact in metabolomics within the metabolic syndrome and how nutrition plays a major role in human health. He has shown continuous leadership and dedication to the Metabolomics Society and the broader community through his commitment to metabolomics standards, to task groups and committees of the society, and most of all his leadership as President of the Metabolomics Society.

Lorraine played a key role in establishing the field of nutritional metabolomics, through the identification of dietary biomarkers and the implementation of dietary interventions, moving the field toward personalized nutrition. Lorraine chaired the 2016 Society annual meeting and has made significant contributions to the Society through workshops, task groups, lectures, and publications.

David’s impact on the field of metabolomics extends to many domains, including pioneering work to promote best practices for statistical rigour, experimental design, quality control, and clinical metabolomics methodology. His many Society contributions include participation in task groups, workshops, publications, lectures, and serving on the Board of Directors.

Dr. Timothy Ebbels, in recognition of his founding work in metabolomics, particularly the essential work in NMR data processing and more recently his contribution and promotion of open science by providing open source code. As a former director of the society, he was instrumental in the society’s development and training of investigators within the community.

Professor Ian Wilson, in recognition of his innovative work in metabolomic analysis, especially in promoting the adoption of HPLC-MS and UPLC-MS-based methodology, and more recently LC-ion mobility-MS, for untargeted metabolic phenotyping. Particularly noteworthy is his work to improve standards and data quality via the introduction of pooled samples for use in quality control.

Prof. Warwick Dunn, in recognition of his active and continuous leadership and dedication to the Metabolomics Society and the broader metabolomics community through his commitment to annual conferences, task groups and committees of the Society. His drive to develop and translate reporting standards for metabolite identification is highly admirable.

Prof. Gary Siuzdak, in recognition of his pioneering role in the development of the field of metabolomics by creating critical enabling technologies, applying them to address important scientific questions, and expanding the field through his outreach, training, and mentorship.

Eiichiro Fukusaki, in recognition of his pioneering work in the field of food metabolomics and developing powerful analytical methods that have enabled the expansion of metabolomics in many different research areas. His strong passion and efforts to promote the metabolomics field resulted in further growth of the field in Asia.

Krista Zanetti, in recognition of her dedication and leadership that have enabled the success of important initiatives within the Metabolomics Society and the broader metabolomics community. Her skilled diplomacy has helped unify and steady the development of the metabolomics community during a period of rapid growth. She deserves particular credit for her mentorship of the EMN.

Elaine Holmes, in recognition of pioneering the use of multivariate statistics for the analysis of spectroscopic data acquired for metabolites, enabling the field of metabolomics/metabonomics to advance in a wide range of disease and therapeutic areas, and being instrumental in applying this approach to the first metabolome/genome-wide association studies.

Kazuki Saito, in recognition of his high-profile scientific contributions to plant metabolomics, pioneering the integrated study of metabolomics and transcriptomics, and early service in organizing the metabolomics community. He was a member of Metabolomics Society Board of Directors from 2010-2014, and hosted 5th International Conference of Plant Metabolomics in Yokohama in 2008.

Ute Roessner, in recognition of her pioneering work to the field of plant metabolomics and positioning Australia at the forefront of plant mass spectral imaging globally. She has also made a significant contribution to the Metabolomics Society, as a member, director, secretary, president, immediate past president and co-founder the Australia New Zealand Metabolomics Network (ANZMN), which was the first international affiliate to the Metabolomics Society in 2013.

Masaru Tomita, in recognition of his outstanding contributions in establishing the Metabolomics Society as one of the original board members, host of the first International Conference in Tsuruoka in 2005, and co-organizer of the 10th International Conference in Tsuruoka in 2014. He is one of the strongest proponents of CE-MS approaches and has a sustained record of academic contributions to metabolomics internationally.

Prof. Roy Goodacre, in recognition of his pioneering work in establishing the Metabolomics Society (Director 2005-2015) and establishment of the journal Metabolomics (2005) as the premier journal in the field. His sustained record of academic contributions and service as a goodwill ambassador for the area of metabolomics has materially advanced the role of metabolomics in the scientific community.

Prof. Matej Orešič, in recognition of his groundbreaking development of metabolomics data processing tools and powerful analytical methods that have enabled systems-level investigations of processes that lead to obesity and diabetes, with a specific focus on type 1 diabetes.

Prof. Robert Hall, in recognition of his role as a founding pioneer and continuous champion for the use of Metabolomics as a powerful tool to better understand plant biochemistry, and as an acclaimed leader and servant to the Metabolomics community.

Prof. Mark Viant, in recognition of his pioneering work in driving forward metabolomics developments in environmental studies and for his role in sustained efforts over many years of service to the Metabolomics Society. His vision and initiative revolutionized the Society’s operations, interactions and reputation, and expanded the influence of the Society in all corners of the world.

Prof. Oliver Fiehn, in recognition of his role as an advocate and a powerful intellect in establishing the utility of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics for more than a decade, resulting in groundbreaking plant and medical studies.

Prof. David Wishart, in recognition of his successful establishment of numerous internationally recognized metabolomics databases and informatics resources that have enabled the advancement of human health, disease, and nutritional metabolomics.

Prof. Lloyd Sumner, in recognition of his outstanding contributions to establishing the Metabolomics Society as a truly international and financially sound organisation as both Treasurer and President, and for his seminal research contributions to the field of plant metabolomics.

Prof. Douglas Kell, in recognition of his pioneering contributions to the fields of metabolomics and Systems Biology, as well as for being a passionate advocator and teacher in these fields.

Dr. Rima Kaddurah-Daouk, in recognition of her outstanding visionary efforts to found the Society in 2004 and her fantastic contributions and energy to grow a vibrant research community in metabolomics.

Prof. Jeremy Nicholson, in recognition of his pioneering and sustained contributions to the fields of toxicological and clinical metabonomics.

Professor Pieter Dorrestein

Pieter Dorrestein

Bio coming soon!

Jules Griffin

Jules Griffin

The Rowett Institute &
University of Aberdeen
UK
Email

  • Chair – International Affiliations Task Group

Dr. Griffin studied chemistry at Magdalen College, Oxford, and went on to do postgraduate research in biochemistry, gaining his DPhil from Oxford in 1999 after studying in the laboratory of Professor George Radda.

Following this he held Postdoctoral posts as a Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital Fellow in Radiology, as a research associate at Imperial College London and, later, as a Royal Society University Research Fellow at the Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge (UK). He was formally appointed as a University Lecturer (the US equivalent to an associate professor) at Cambridge University in 2007.

Dr. Griffin’s group uses a range of analytical techniques including NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (they have access to a 500 MHz NMR spectrometer, a Thermo LTQ ion trap, a Waters QTOF Ultima, a Waters Quattro Premiere triple quadrupole LCMS and two GC-MS), to follow metabolism in the brain to look at a range of disease processes. The majority of his work has centered on mouse models of disease including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses.

More recently, Dr. Griffin’s group has been using a combination of animal models (mouse, rat and C.elegans) to understand the metabolic consequences of “metabolic syndrome” including type II diabetes, obesity, fatty liver disease and dyslipidaemia. His studies have attempted to cross-correlate metabolomic data with proteomics and transcriptomics to create a “systems biology” description of the consequences of pathology and genetic modulation related to the metabolic syndrome.

Lorraine Brennan

Lorraine Brennan

University College Dublin
Ireland

Professor Brennan has been in University College Dublin (UCD) since 2000, as a Research Fellow, Career Track Investigator, Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, and, since 2015, Professor. Previously she was a postdoctoral fellow in Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica in Portugal and a visiting scientist in the University of Cambridge, and was educated in Trinity College Dublin and the University of Southampton.

Professor Brennan is at the forefront of nutrition and metabolomics research, running the Nutrition, Biomarkers, and Health research group, obtaining considerable national and European research funding (over €6 million as PI), and publishing numerous peer-reviewed articles. Recent funding successes have included a European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Award for the project ‘A-DIET: Metabolomics based biomarkers of dietary intake – new tools for nutrition research’ (2015-2020; €1.9 m).

Professor Brennan led UCD’s inputs into Joint Programme Initiatives (JPIs) in the areas of ‘A Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life’ and ‘Biomarkers for Nutrition and Health’. Professor Brennan has supervised 13 PhD students and two Masters students to completion as Principal Supervisor. She has been Director of the European Nutrigenomics Organisation since 2014, and is currently Secretary of the Irish Nutrition Society. Professor Brennan has acted as an external examiner for several PhD vivas and has given more than 20 invited conference presentations. She reviews numerous manuscripts, including for leading journals such as Nature, Journal of Proteome Research, OMICS, PLoS ONE, PLoS, Analytical Biochemistry, American Journal of Physiology, AJCN, BJN. Her publications have obtained over 6,000 citations, and a h-index of 39. She is also involved in developing the incorporation of research into teaching, and a range of outreach activities.

David Broadhurst

David Broadhurst

Edith Cowan University
Australia
  • Co-Chair – Data Analysis Task Group

Professor David Broadhurst, born Chester UK, holds a first class honours degree in Electronic Engineering, an MSc in Medical Informatics, and a PhD on the subject of ‘‘Application of Artificial Neural Networks and Evolutionary Algorithms to Metabolic Profiling’’. He has been an active member of the metabolomics community for the last 18 years, where he is a recognized expert in design of experiments, signal processing, biostatistics, and machine learning. 

David worked for an extended period as a post-doctoral research fellow developing large-scale clinical metabolomics protocols alongside Dr. Warrick Dunn, at the University of Manchester as part of Professor Douglas Kell’s Bioanalytical Sciences Group. In 2009 he moved to Cork University Maternity Hospital, Ireland, to investigate pre-symptomatic metabolite biomarkers predictive of major pregnancy diseases. In 2011 David was appointed Associate Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Alberta, Canada, where he was scientific lead for a range of basic/clinical metabolomics projects, and continued his pregnancy related research. 

More recently he has expanded his research portfolio to a diverse range of post-genomic translational/precision medicine projects. In March 2016 he was appointed to his current position as Professor at Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia. In addition to many collaborative Systems Biology projects. His current research primarily focuses the application and optimization of diverse multivariate modelling techniques (parametric & non-parametric linear models, decision trees, machine learning, Structural Equation Modelling, Multilevel random-effects models, etc.) within the domain of systems-biology. 

Additionally, he has research interests in data visualization, design of experiments, and developing quality assurance procedures for ‘omic based studies. David travels extensively around the globe lecturing on the perils of poor experimental design and importance of robust and diverse statistical analysis.

Tim Ebbels

Tim Ebbels

Imperial College London
UK
Email

Tim Ebbels obtained his PhD in astrophysics from the University of Cambridge and in 1998 moved into bioinformatics via postdoctoral work at Imperial College in the metabolic profiling group of Prof Jeremy Nicholson. He was a key post-doctoral member of the Consortium for Metabonomic Toxicology (COMET), a large academic-industry collaboration which developed expert systems for predicting adverse effects in pre-clinical toxicity studies via metabolic profiling. 

In 2003 he joined Prof David Jones’ group at University College London to work on modelling and visualisation of transcriptomic data. In 2005 he returned to a faculty position at Imperial, within one of the world’s largest metabolomics departments. His group focuses on the application of bioinformatic, machine learning and chemometric techniques to post-genomic data, with a particular emphasis on metabolic profiles. He is involved in projects ranging from ecotoxicology, through molecular epidemiology, to the development of in vitro omics platforms to predict carcinogenicity. Much work focuses on detailed modelling of the analytical technologies used to obtain metabolic profiles, but his group is also addressing problems of data integration, visualisation and time series analysis.

Professor Ian Wilson

Ian Wilson

Bio coming soon!

Warwick "Rick" Dunn

Warwick “Rick” Dunn

University of Liverpool
UK
Email

  • Chair – Website & Communication Committee
  • Co-Chair – Metabolite Identification Task Group

Professor Warwick “Rick” Dunn holds a chair in Analytical and Clinical Metabolomics at the University of Liverpool. He obtained a lectureship in 2011 at the University of Manchester and moved to a lectureship at the University of Birmingham in 2013. He obtained a BSc(Hons) in Chemistry with Analytical Chemistry from the University of Hull and a PhD from the same university focussed on developing interfaces to allow online monitoring of chemical process plants using mass spectrometry in association with BP Chemicals. He leads the Analytical and Clinical Metabolomics Group at the University of Liverpool. His research is focused on two areas (1) the development of new analytical tools and methods to enhance data quality, efficiency of metabolite annotation, coverage of detectable metabolites and sample collection strategies and (2) the application of untargeted and targeted metabolomics to the study of metabolism across the life course in humans including pre-birth, ageing, endocrinology, inflammatory and immune diseases and cancers with a focus on precision medicine. He was one of the founding coordinators of the metabolomics quality assurance and quality control consortium (www.mqacc.org). He was a board member of the society from 2010 to 2015 and now from 2022 to 2024. He sits on the Website and Communications committee, conference committee and education and training committee of the Metabolomics Society.  His career goals are to make metabolomics a standard resource applied in biological research and to train the next generation of metabolomics researchers.

Gary Siuzdak

Gary Siuzdak

The Scripps Research Institute
USA
Email

Gary Siuzdak is Professor of Chemistry, Molecular and Computational Biology and Director of the Center for Metabolomics at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California.  He has also served as Vice President of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry and guest faculty at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. His research has focused on developing mass spectrometry-based metabolomic technologies including nanostructure-based imaging, XCMS and METLIN informatic tools, and their application to understanding the fundamental biochemistry of cancer, stem cells and chronic pain.  He has two books, “Mass Spectrometry for Biotechnology” and the “The Expanding Role of Mass Spectrometry in Biotechnology”.  My interest in serving the Metabolomics Society is to further help this rapidly growing and exciting area of science.

Eiichiro Fukusaki

Eiichiro Fukusaki

Bio coming soon!

Krista Zanetti

National Cancer Institute (NIC), NIH
USA
Email

Krista Zanetti is a Program Officer in the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP), Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Zanetti earned her Ph.D. in Nutrition from Cornell University in 2003 and joined the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program at the NCI. During the first year of her fellowship, she earned an M.P.H. at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Zanetti then conducted primary research in the Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis in the NCI’s Center for Cancer Research from 2004 to 2010.

Since joining EGRP in 2010, Dr. Zanetti’s primary focus has been building infrastructure and capacity to support metabolomics in population-based studies. In 2014, she spearheaded collaborative efforts to establish the trans-NIH international Consortium of Metabolomics Studies (COMETS), which brings together 57 prospective cohorts from the North America, South America, Europe and Asia. COMETS allows investigators from across multiple disease phenotypes to:

  1. Leverage existing resources and data
  2. Work collectively to develop methods, tools and protocols for data harmonization and sharing, quality control and data standardization.

More recently, Dr. Zanetti collaboratively organized a meeting in 2017 that led to the establishment of the metabolomics Quality Assurance and quality Control Consortium (mQACC). mQACC’s mission is to engage the metabolomics community to communicate and promote the development, dissemination and harmonization of best QA/QC practices in untargeted metabolomics.

Elaine Holmes

Elaine Holmes

Bio coming soon!

Kazuki Saito

Kazuki Saito

RIKEN PSC
Chiba University
Japan
Email

Website 1
Website 2

Kazuki Saito obtained his Ph. D from the University of Tokyo in 1982. After staying in Keio University in Japan and Ghent University in Belgium (Prof. Marc Van Montagu’s laboratory) as a post-doc, in 1995 he has been appointed as a full professor at Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, until now. He now holds the post of Deputy Director of RIKEN Plant Science Center, where he is also Group Director of the Metabolomic Function Research Group.

Kazuki is one of the pioneers in the field of plant metabolomics, featuring with the efforts on functional genomics by integration with transcriptomics. For his distinguished research, in 2010 he was awarded The Prize for Science and Technology (Research Category) by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. Kazuki’s current research aims to understand the mechanism and regulation of plant metabolism through the genomics and post-genomics approaches and subsequently to apply the obtained knowledge to synthetic biology.

Ute Roessner

Ute Roessner

Metabolomics Australia
University of Melbourne
Australia
Email

Dr. Roessner has obtained her PhD in Plant Biochemistry at the Max-Planck-Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology in Germany, where she developed novel GC-MS based methods to analyse metabolites in plants. With the combination of small molecule analytics and sophisticated bioinformatics and statistics the field of metabolomics was born and is today an important tool in biological sciences, systems biology and biomarker discovery. In 2003 she moved to Australia where she established a GC-MS and LC-MS based metabolomics platform as part of the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics. Since 2007 Dr. Roessner has been involved in the setup of Metabolomics Australia, an Australian Federal Government investment (National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy 5.1 Evolving Biomolecular Platforms) through Bioplatforms Australia Ltd and now leads the MA node at the School of Botany, The University of Melbourne, Australia.

I consider myself as one of the pioneers of Metabolomics technology developments especially in the plant research / agricultural fields. My particular research interests always have been to use Metabolomics as a tool to better understand plant physiology and improve crop quality. However, due to leading a national Metabolomics service centre I also promote and apply Metabolomics in other research areas such as biomedical, microbial, foods and environmental. I have expressed interest to join the board of the Metabolomics society for a few years for multiple reasons. Most importantly to represent the Australian / New Zealand and Asian currently loosely connected as Australasian Metabolomics Network of which I function as the President. Secondly I believe my experiences in metabolomics applications as well as in a service setting can be of benefit for the society in contributing a different view. I am very enthusiastic to be involved in the society’s growth and promotion and decision making. The organisation of the last annual society meeting has hopefully proven my engagement and courage towards the society’s best in future.

Masaru Tomita

Masaru Tomita

Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University
Japan

Bio coming soon!

Roy Goodacre

Roy Goodacre

University of Liverpool
UK
Email
  • Society President – Board of Directors
  • Chair – Data Analysis Task Group

Roy Goodacre is Professor of Biological Chemistry at the University of Liverpool and a co-director of the Centre for Metabolomics Research.  He helped to develop and establish long-term metabolomics which allows fusion of GC-MS and LC-MS data.  These approaches have been used by his team and collaborators to profile health populations and investigate the frailty phenotype during the ageing process.

Trained as a microbiologist in Bristol, UK, he has a fascination with the microbial world.  Thus, in parallel, in order to understand metabolic flux on a single cell level for bacterial community analysis, his group are currently developing high spatial resolution photothermal infrared and Raman-based imaging methods which can be used to generate chemical images of microbial cells.  Please see the wiki for more details.

Roy has published a substantial number of primary papers and reviews in metabolomics and data processing as well as Raman Spectroscopy, and if you like such metrics he has a H-index of over 100.

Outside of metabolomics, Roy is a proud Welshman and avid rugby supporter.  He is fascinated by the lunar landscape of Lanzarote and visits with the family as often as he can, where he loves to walk and visit the many charms that this volcanic island has to offer.

Matej Orešič

Matej Orešič

Örebro University
Sweden

Email

Prof. Matej Orešič holds a PhD in biophysics from Cornell University (NY, USA). He is a group leader in systems medicine at the University of Turku, visiting associate professor at the Örebro University, and guest professor in lipids and nutrition at the Oil Crops Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences. Prof. Orešič is one of the initiators of the Nordic Metabolomics Society and currently its chair of the board. As of 2016, he is a Lifetime Honorary Fellow of the Metabolomics Society.

His main research areas are metabolomics applications in biomedical research and systems medicine. He is particularly interested in the identification of disease vulnerabilities associated with different metabolic phenotypes and the underlying mechanisms linking these vulnerabilities with the development of specific disorders or their co-morbidities, with main focus on type 1 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Prof. Orešič also initiated the popular MZmine open source project, leading to popular software for metabolomics data processing.

Robert Hall

Robert Hall

Plant Research International
Netherlands
Email

Professor Dr. Robert D Hall gained a PhD in plant biotechnology and enzymology (Edinburgh, 1984) and has subsequently completed 30 years research experience, including 20 years project / group management experience. He moved to The Netherlands in 1987 where he currently works at Wageningen Plant Research as Deputy Business Unit Manager Bioscience. He also holds a Special Professorship in plant metabolomics at Wageningen University. He was previously Director of the Netherlands Centre of Biosystems Genomics, a Public Private partnership in plant science and was coordinator of the EU-METAPHOR project. He is co-founder of the Netherlands Metabolomics Centre and currently serves on the Supervisory Board. He (co)organised the first ever international metabolomics conference in Wageningen in 2002 and the international Metabolomics Society conference in Amsterdam in 2010. He was on the Board of the international Metabolomics Society from 2008-2014 and was the elected President (2010-2012). He was awarded an Honorary Lifetime Fellowship of the Society in 2015. He is scientific advisor / member of a number of (inter)national research committees coordinating research strategy and funding both in Europe and N. America. His primary research activities are now centred on functional genomics and developing metabolomics technologies for application in plants for both science and industry. He is on the Editorial Boards of Frontiers in Metabolomics, Molecular Biotechnology and the journal Metabolomics. He has completed nearly 200 publications of which 75% are in peer-reviewed journals and he has edited 3 books including 2 on Plant metabolomics.

Web Page

Mark Viant

Mark Viant

University of Birmingham
UK
Email
  • Co-Chair – Model Organism Metabolomes

Mark R. Viant is a Professor of Metabolomics in the School of Biosciences at the University of Birmingham, UK. He also serves as the Director of the Natural Environment Research Council’s (NERC) Environmental Metabolomics Facility at Birmingham. Prof. Viant received his BSc in Chemistry and PhD in Chemical Physics at the University of Southampton, UK. Following postdoctoral research in chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, he shifted his research interests into environmental toxicology, conducting further postdoctoral studies at the University of California, Davis. 

In 2003 he was awarded a NERC Advanced Fellowship and relocated to the University of Birmingham, where his research team now focuses on the development and application of both NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry in environmental metabolomics, specifically as tools for chemical risk assessment and environmental monitoring. His primary research interests include the molecular characterisation and understanding of stress responses in aquatic organisms, in particular to environmental pollution. In addition his team develops novel analytical and bioinformatic approaches for metabolomics. He has authored over 90 publications, including pioneering applications of metabolomics to environmental health issues in aquatic organisms.

Oliver Fiehn

Oliver Fiehn

UC Davis
USA
Email

Dr. Fiehn obtained his MSc in Analytical Sciences in 1993 from the Free University Berlin and then received his PhD in 1997 at the Technical University of Berlin in Analytical Chemistry. From 1998-1999 Dr. Feihn started out as an associate research scientist in metabolomics at the Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology in Potsdam. He later became a group leader from 2000-2004. Dr. Feihn joined the faculty at the University of California at Davis in 2004 as an associate professor with the department of Molecular & Cellular Biology at UC Davis. He is also a member of the Metabolomics Society and the American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

David Wishart

David S Wishart

University of Alberta, TMIC (The Metabolomics Innovation Centre)
Canada

Professor, Departments of Biological Sciences and Computing Science, University of Alberta
Director, The Metabolomics Innovation Centre (TMIC)

Dr. David Wishart (PhD Yale, 1991) is a Professor in the Departments of Biological Sciences and Computing Science at the University of Alberta. He also holds adjunct appointments with the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and with the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. He has been with the University of Alberta since 1995.

Dr. Wishart’s research interests are very wide ranging, covering nanotechnology, molecular biology, analytical chemistry, metabolomics and bioinformatics. For the past 12 years, Dr. Wishart has led the “Human Metabolome Project” (HMP), a multi-university, multi-investigator project that is cataloguing all of the known metabolites in human tissues and biofluids. Using advanced methods in NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, multi-dimensional chromatography and machine learning Dr. Wishart and his colleagues have identified or found evidence for more than 110,000 metabolites in the human body. This information has been archived on a freely accessible web-resource called the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). More recently, Dr. Wishart’s efforts have focused on using metabolomics to develop rapid diagnostic tests for cancer, colitis and kidney disease. This is part of an ongoing effort to integrate metabolomics into precision medicine.

Over the course of his career Dr. Wishart has published more than 400 research papers in high profile journals on a wide variety of subject areas. He currently directs The Metabolomics Innovation Centre (TMIC), Canada’s national metabolomics laboratory.

Lloyd Sumner

Lloyd W. Sumner

MU Metabolomics Center
USA
Email

  • Co-Chair – Metabolite Identification Task Group

Dr. Sumner acquired his B.Sc. degree in chemistry with a minor in mathematics in 1989 from Cameron University in Lawton, OK, USA and a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry focused on mass spectrometry in 1993 from Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, OK, USA. He then joined Texas A&M University, College Station TX, where he was the Director of the Mass Spectrometry Applications Laboratory and where he later served as the cofounder and Associate Director of the TAMU Laboratory for Biological Mass Spectrometry with Prof. David H Russell. He joined The Noble Foundation in 1999 and rose to the rank of Professor within the Plant Biology Division. Dr. Sumner relocated to the University of Missouri, Columbia in January 2016 as a Professor in the Biochemistry Department and Director of the new University of Missouri Metabolomics Center. 

Dr. Sumner’s research is focused on the development, integration and application of large-scale biochemical profiling of plant metabolites, proteins, and transcripts (metabolomics, proteomics and transcriptomics) for the discovery and characterization of the molecular and biochemical components related to plant natural products/specialized metabolites biosynthesis. He also applies these integrated omics technologies for greater insight into the physiological and biochemical consequences of gene expression and system responses to genetic and environmental perturbations. In the process, he has published approximately 135 peer reviewed articles and book chapters; many with leading national and international collaborators. 

Dr. Sumner’s research is or has been supported by the Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, NSF 2010, NSF Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, NSF Major Research Instrumentation program, NSF-JST joint Metabolomics for a Low Carbon Society, NSF Integrative Organismal Systems, and The Oklahoma Commission for the Advancement of Science and Technology. 

Dr. Sumner is currently a Fellow of The American Association for the Advancement of Science; President of the Phytochemical Society of North America (2014-2017), former Treasurer (2010-2012) and President (2008-2010) of the Metabolomics Society; 2013 Lifetime Honorary Fellow of the Metabolomics Society; Co-founding Member of the International Advisory Committee for Plant Metabolomics; Principal investigator of a new Plant, Algae, and Microbial Metabolomics Research Coordination Network (PAMM-NET), and a 2007 Distinguished Alumni of Cameron University. Dr. Sumner has served as a Managing Editor for Plant Physiology, Front Pages Co-Editor and Editorial Board member for the journal Metabolomics, Associate Editor of Frontiers in Plant Metabolism and Chemical Diversity, and review Editor for several plant and metabolomics related Frontiers journals.

Professor Douglas Kell

Douglas Kell

Bio coming soon!

Rima Kaddurah-Daouk

Rima Kaddurah-Daouk

Duke University Medical Center USA
  • Chair – Precision Medicine & Pharmacometabolomics Task Group

Bio coming soon!

Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Jeremy Nicholson

Bio coming soon!